The following educational opportunities are available to industry professionals through Build with Strength and NRMCA.


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Build With Strength and NRMCA offer several courses on the design and construction of high performance concrete buildings. Courses can be tailored to different formats—from  all-day seminars, half-day seminars, lunch-and-learns to webinars.

Fundamentals of Concrete Webinar Series

This online course offers the nuts and bolts of concrete materials, mixtures, and construction practices. From the materials used to make concrete, the standards they must meet, the way it’s made, delivered, placed and finished. If you are a design professional, contractor, concrete producer, or a supplier to the concrete industry, this course is a must. If you are new to concrete, this will be your crash course on your way to becoming a concrete pro. If you’ve worked with concrete for a long time, this will be an excellent refresher on the latest methods, techniques and standards for concrete. The course is taught online, in three parts, made up of three sessions each for a total of nine information packed webinars.

Who Should Attend?
Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Concrete Producers and Product/Equipment Suppliers

Instructors:
Colin Lobo, PhD, PE, Exec VP, Engineering for NRMCA
Brian Killingsworth, PE, Exec VP, Pavements for NRMCA
Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Exec VP, Structures for NRMCA

This course provides an overview of concrete making materials and the properties required for plastic and hardened concrete. Factors that influence the quality of concrete will be covered. It will discuss some of the mechanical and durability characteristics required of concrete for various applications subjected to different exposure conditions. The materials used in concrete mixtures, including portland and blended cement, supplementary cementitious materials, aggregates, water and admixtures will be discussed along with the general concepts of proportioning concrete mixtures. This course also covers the basics of troubleshooting concrete, such as workability, placeability, finishability, and causes for cracking and other problems.

Learning Objectives

  • Have a general overview of all the materials used in concrete
  • Understand the chemical reaction between cementitous materials and water
  • Understand the properties of freshly mixed concrete as required for different applications.
  • Discuss factors that impact the compressive and flexural strength of concrete
  • Define curing and explain why it’s important
  • Understand factors that impact volume change and potential for cracking
  • Identify the concerns with heat of hydration in massive concrete members
  • Identify causes and solutions for durability of concrete, such as resistance to freezing and thawing cycles, alkali aggregate reactions, sulfate attack, and corrosion of reinforcing steel

Schedule (sessions will be recorded for later viewing if you miss a session)
Session 1 – July 15, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Concrete Materials Part 1
Session 2 – July 22, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Concrete Materials Part 2 and Fresh Concrete Properties
Session 3 – July 29, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Hardened Concrete Properties

Continuing Education
3 AIA-CES LU | 3 PDH

Price: $150

Register Online

This course is an overview of the proper methods and procedures for transporting, forming, placing and finishing concrete. The material covers transporting, forms, placement tips, concrete conveying devices, and curing concrete, as well as precautions for hot and cold weather concreting. It briefly discusses some problems associated with improper construction practices that can result in cracking, scaling and other defects in the finished structure and resources to select repair methods.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the different forming methods for concrete
  • Properly schedule the rate of delivery of ready mixed concrete
  • Recognize the responsibilities of the involved stakeholders
  • Equipment for conveying and placing concrete
  • Identify important aspects of preparing the subgrade and forming surfaces
  • Tools used for finishing concrete
  • Sequence of procedures when finishing concrete slabs
  • Joints in concrete and the different purposes of joints
  • Load transfer between pavement slabs
  • Tolerances for floor and slab flatness and levelness
  • Basic causes and remedies for defects in concrete construction

Schedule (sessions will be recorded for later viewing if you miss a session)
Session 1 – August 5, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Concrete Forming and Site Preparation
Session 2 – August 12, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Delivery, Placing and Finishing
Session 3 – August 19, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Extreme Weather Conditions and Troubleshooting

Continuing Education
3 AIA-CES LU | 3 PDH

Price: $150

Register Online

This course covers the Building Code requirements for concrete materials (ACI 318) and the specifications for concrete as addressed in ACI 301, Specification for Structural Concrete. The presentation covers strength and durability requirements for concrete as addressed in these industry standards. The second session is an overview of the Specification for Ready Mixed Concrete, ASTM C94 and discusses the aspects of ordering concrete, production, delivery and testing. It covers the responsibilities of the purchaser and the manufacturer of ready mixed concrete. The third session covers tips for improving project specifications including how to reference national consensus standards and present performance criteria for concrete.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the difference between a Code and a Specification
  • Outline the requirements for strength of concrete
  • Discuss the durability exposure classification and associated requirements for concrete mixtures
  • Describe the scope of ASTM C94 and the responsibilities of the manufacturer and purchaser
  • Discuss the process of ordering ready mixed concrete
  • Identify the requirements for concrete production facilities
  • Summarize the requirements for delivery of ready mixed concrete
  • Discuss the acceptance testing of ready mixed concrete
  • Learn how to implement performance-based project specifications
  • Implement strategies for improving concrete specification

Schedule (sessions will be recorded for later viewing if you miss a session)
Session 1 – August 26, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Standards for Concrete Construction
Session 2 – September 2, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Standards for Production and Delivery
Session 3 – September 9, 2020, 2-3 pm eastern: Project Specifications for Concrete

Continuing Education
3 AIA-CES LU | 3 PDH

Price: $150

Register Online

On-demand Webinars

These are the same highly attended live webinars we offer but in a recorded format so you can take them at your pace, on your schedule. The webinars are free and offer AIA-CES Learning Units for architects and Professional Development Hours (PDH) for engineers. Click on the titles below to register:

New on-demand courses will be added every week.

We also have many on-demand courses available through Hanley Wood University:

Live Webinars

Click Here to Register

AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

This course presents information and tools architects and engineers can use to select and design Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). ICFs combine the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the energy efficiency of rigid insulation, providing an ideal solution for multi-family, commercial and institutional applications. The presentation will explore the evolution of ICFs and their growth from single family in the late early 1990s to a mainstream structural system for single story retail to high-rise residential. The presentation will discuss preliminary wall sizing and placement along with structural design considerations including design details and construction inspections.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the attributes of insulating concrete forms and when to select it as the building system for a project.
  • Understand the basic design and detailing of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs)
  • Explore the evolution of ICFs as a structural system for low-, mid-rise applications.
  • Understand how ICFs improve occupant safety, fire resistance and noise transmission for office, hospital, school and retail buildings, among others.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Scott Campbell, PhD, PE, Senior Vice President, Structures and Codes, NRMCA

Click Here to Register

AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Concrete is used in nearly every structure we build today, including buildings, bridges, homes and infrastructure. With greater emphasis placed on sustainability, design professionals are faced with the challenge of meeting traditional design criteria with evolving criteria that support green building and efforts to reduce impact on climate change. Performance-based specifications for concrete represent an important synergy with sustainability initiatives because they provide the opportunity to optimize mixtures for performance that can also reduce environmental impacts. Prescriptive specifications often adversely impact the environmental footprint of concrete structures. This presentation outlines how concrete performance can be improved while lowering environmental footprint by implementing performance-based specifications.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the difference between performance-based specification and prescriptive specifications
  • Discover how performance-based specifications can improve performance and lower environmental impact of concrete structures.
  • Learn how to implement performance-based specifications in projects.
  • Demonstrate the importance of balancing structural and architectural performance of concrete with green building strategies.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Colin Lobo, PhD, PE Executive Vice President, Engineering, NRMCA

A prime ingredient of sustainable architecture is longevity. If a building doesn’t last, it wastes of a lot of energy, from both a human and a resource perspective, not to mention the economic value. Durability is the ultimate profitability. Builders are realizing that the promise of low first-cost is insufficient for portfolio value generation. From energy efficiency, lower insurance costs, and moisture resistance, barriers to a concrete structure increasingly collapse when industry professionals are equipped with the right design tools and knowledge.

Building materials also play a big role in deciding the safety and resiliency of our structures. From Edgewater to Houston to Los Angeles, the increased incidences of apartment fire conflagrations have provided a glimpse of what it looks like when the predicted effects of inferior building materials and code trade-offs work in tandem. The results are not pretty. Through design solutions demonstrated in this workshop, we can focus on strength rather than disaster response, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to the owners.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

This presentation provides guidance for architects, engineers and builders on how to design and build high performance reinforced concrete multifamily residential buildings using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility of highly engineered rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. With increased attention to occupant safety and comfort, design professionals can take advantage of concrete’s inherent fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features when designing multifamily residential buildings. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The article will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF concrete construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to building owners.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs), combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility and energy efficiency of rigid insulation, provide an ideal solution for commercial and institutional buildings. With a lower first cost than wood and steel construction, ICFs improves occupant safety, fire resistance and noise transmission for office, hospital, school and retail buildings, among others. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The presentation will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

This presentation provides insight on the economic benefits of building multifamily residential with concrete using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with high performance rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for developers of apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. ICFs are remarkably cost competitive with wood frame construction on a first-cost basis and offer operational cost savings through lower energy bills and reduced insurance costs. ICFs offer fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features with substantial cost saving. The presentation provides guidance on areas where ICFs can reduce construction schedules further improving the bottom line. Cost comparisons are presented to demonstrate how building with ICFs can increase your return on investment from a first-cost perspective and long-term income strategy.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

Other AIA-Approved Programs

NRMCA has other AIA-approved programs available to help designers, owners and developers to utilize concrete for their projects.  These other AIA-approved courses are:

A Developer/Builder’s Perspective: Panelized ICFs + Helix Rebar

Architect’s Perspective on Building with Concrete Using ICF & Passive House Case Study

Buildings-Related Research at the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub

Environmental Advantages of Concrete Systems

Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete Structures

Opportunities in NetZero School Design

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.