The following educational opportunities are available to industry professionals through Build with Strength and NRMCA.


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Build with Strength and NRMCA offer several courses on the design and construction of high performance concrete buildings. Courses can be tailored to different formats—from  all-day seminars, half-day seminars, lunch-and-learns to webinars.

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Concrete is the material of choice for the tallest buildings in the world and infrastructure designed to last centuries. To meet demands for these cutting-edge projects, concrete must be stronger, more durable and more workable than ever before. This presentation explores how new products, manufacturing methods and research are developing innovative concretes to meet these new challenges. Bendable concrete, smog eating concrete and carbon capture are just a few examples of new technologies enhancing a product that is nearly 5,000 years in development.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand new technologies used in concrete manufacturing.
  • Discover how innovative concrete products can improve project performance.
  • Learn how to implement the latest concrete innovations in building and infrastructure projects.
  • Demonstrate the importance of incorporating new technologies to enhance resilience and sustainability in the built environment.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President/Division Head, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Donn Thompson AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Director, Building Innovations, NRMCA

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Concrete is used in nearly every structure we build today, including buildings, bridges, homes and infrastructure. With greater emphasis placed on sustainability, design professionals are faced with the challenge of meeting traditional design criteria with evolving criteria that support green building and efforts to reduce impact on climate change. Performance-based specifications for concrete represent an important synergy with sustainability initiatives because they provide the opportunity to optimize mixtures for performance that can also reduce environmental impacts. Prescriptive specifications often adversely impact the environmental footprint of concrete structures. This presentation outlines how concrete performance can be improved while lowering environmental footprint by implementing performance-based specifications.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the difference between performance-based specification and prescriptive specifications
  • Discover how performance-based specifications can improve performance and lower environmental impact of concrete structures.
  • Learn how to implement performance-based specifications in projects.
  • Demonstrate the importance of balancing structural and architectural performance of concrete with green building strategies.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Colin Lobo, PhD, PE Executive Vice President, Engineering, NRMCA

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Over the past several decades, there has been a continuous increase in human and economic loss from disaster events. The rise in disasters and their consequences is related to a rise in people’s vulnerability, induced by human development. However, examples of resiliency planning and more stringent building code requirements still lag. This presentation will offer a view on emerging risks and opportunities as human and economic losses from disasters increase, with the overarching goal of supporting and advancing resilience in future construction of buildings and critical infrastructure.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the increased risks from natural hazards and how resilient construction can support long-term sustainability.
  • Identify approaches to mitigate the effects of natural hazards.
  • Underpin a community’s economic vitality and safety through natural hazard mitigation.
  • Demonstrate the importance of incorporating resilient standards in construction.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Tien Peng, Assoc AIA, LEED AP+, PMP, Senior Vice President, Sustainability, Codes and Standards, NRMCA

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Zero-energy school construction is a growing trend across the country. A combination of advanced energy-efficiency strategies, affordable solar power and an innovative concrete building system called insulating concrete forms (ICFs) is making it possible. ICFs combine the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility and energy efficiency of rigid insulation. This presentation provides designers with zero-energy strategies along with details on how to take advantage of the high R-value and thermal mass of ICFs to offer affordable schools with significant energy cost savings over the long term.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the principles and strategies behind zero-energy school design and construction.
  • Understand how innovative concrete systems such as ICFs are being used to achieve zero-energy schools.
  • Understand how a combination of energy-efficiency strategies, high-performance envelopes and solar power are used to meet zero-energy criteria.
  • Understand the contribution concrete makes to safe and productive schools by providing energy-efficient, quiet and resilient structures.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Kenny Stanfield, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Sherman Carter Barnhart

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

This presentation provides insight on the economic benefits of building multifamily residential buildings with concrete using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with high performance rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for developers of apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. ICFs are remarkably cost competitive with wood frame construction on a first cost basis and offer operational cost savings through lower energy bills and reduced insurance costs. ICFs offer fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features with substantial cost saving. The presentation provides guidance on areas where ICFs can reduce construction schedules further improving the bottom line. Cost comparisons are presented to demonstrate how building with ICFs can increase your return on investment from a first cost perspective and long-term income strategy.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the benefits of concrete buildings built with Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs) compared to wood frame for multifamily residential projects
  • Demonstrate the economic benefits of building multifamily projects with ICFs
  • Recognize the ways that ICF construction can save investors both time and money
  • Understand the long-term value proposition of building with concrete and ICFs

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Ryan Bedford, President, Bedford Developments

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

When looking at the environmental impact of a building, it is important to assess every stage of the environmental life cycle, from material extraction and product manufacturing to building operations and maintenance through to end-of-life. Concrete offers many environmental attributes that help reduce the overall environmental life cycle impacts of a building. This presentation explores how life cycle assessment can be used to measure and lower the environmental impacts of buildings.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize how concrete can reduce the life cycle impacts of a building.
  • Understand life cycle assessment (LCA) and how it can be used to help measure and reduce the environmental impacts of a building.
  • Explore how LCA is used in the green building standards.
  • Explore an example of how LCA software tools can be used to reduce environmental impact of a building.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

James Bogdan, LEED AP, QEP, Senior Director, Sustainability Initiatives, NRMCA

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

Structure fires and wildfires result in significant loss of life and property in the United States each year. In addition to the direct losses of fighting fires, relocating residents and rebuilding, large fire events can cause substantial indirect losses to communities. There has been an increase in single family and multifamily structure fire losses, partly due to increased use of combustible construction methods. This presentation will investigate the causes of these fires and provide balanced design recommendations using both active and passive fire protection strategies. It will suggest several noncombustible concrete building systems to help reduce risk of fire loss in buildings.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the reasons for the increase of fire losses in single family and multifamily buildings from structure fires and wildfires.
  • Learn how the building code has evolved to increase the reliance on active fire protection systems and reduced their reliance on passive fire protection systems.
  • Recognize the balance fire design principles that can improve fire safety in buildings.
  • Understand the contribution noncombustible materials such as concrete makes to fire safety.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

Shamim Rashid-Sumar, PE, FSFPE, Vice President, Fire Codes and Standards, NRMCA

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AIA-CES: 1 HSW LU (1 Hour) | 1 PDH | 0.1 CEU

In addition to performance, budget and aesthetics, design professionals are now being asked to evaluate the environmental burdens of their design choices. Measuring the impacts of buildings, assemblies and products can be complex. Every design decision, from material and product selection to envelope design and construction can have an impact on the environment and the methods used to evaluate those decisions are still not widely understood. This presentation will address critical issues the design professional should consider as he/she evaluates the environmental impacts of building materials to maximize performance and deliver lasting value.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize how design decisions can affect environmental impacts of a buildings.
  • Learn how the life cycle perspective when making design decisions can help create sustainable projects.
  • Identify how critical issues such as land use, human health, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions can impact environmental performance.
  • Understand how life cycle assessment can play a role in evaluating environmental impacts of design decisions.

Who Should Attend?

Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Developers, Building Owners and Product Manufacturers

Instructors

Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Executive Vice President, Structures and Sustainability, NRMCA

James Bogdan, LEED AP, QEP, Senior Director, Sustainability Initiatives, NRMCA

A prime ingredient of sustainable architecture is longevity. If a building doesn’t last, it wastes of a lot of energy, from both a human and a resource perspective, not to mention the economic value. Durability is the ultimate profitability. Builders are realizing that the promise of low first-cost is insufficient for portfolio value generation. From energy efficiency, lower insurance costs, and moisture resistance, barriers to a concrete structure increasingly collapse when industry professionals are equipped with the right design tools and knowledge.

Building materials also play a big role in deciding the safety and resiliency of our structures. From Edgewater to Houston to Los Angeles, the increased incidences of apartment fire conflagrations have provided a glimpse of what it looks like when the predicted effects of inferior building materials and code trade-offs work in tandem. The results are not pretty. Through design solutions demonstrated in this workshop, we can focus on strength rather than disaster response, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to the owners.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

This presentation provides guidance for architects, engineers and builders on how to design and build high performance reinforced concrete multifamily residential buildings using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility of highly engineered rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. With increased attention to occupant safety and comfort, design professionals can take advantage of concrete’s inherent fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features when designing multifamily residential buildings. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The article will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF concrete construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to building owners.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs), combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility and energy efficiency of rigid insulation, provide an ideal solution for commercial and institutional buildings. With a lower first cost than wood and steel construction, ICFs improves occupant safety, fire resistance and noise transmission for office, hospital, school and retail buildings, among others. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The presentation will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

This presentation provides insight on the economic benefits of building multifamily residential with concrete using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with high performance rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for developers of apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. ICFs are remarkably cost competitive with wood frame construction on a first-cost basis and offer operational cost savings through lower energy bills and reduced insurance costs. ICFs offer fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features with substantial cost saving. The presentation provides guidance on areas where ICFs can reduce construction schedules further improving the bottom line. Cost comparisons are presented to demonstrate how building with ICFs can increase your return on investment from a first-cost perspective and long-term income strategy.

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.

Other AIA-Approved Programs

NRMCA has other AIA-approved programs available to help designers, owners and developers to utilize concrete for their projects.  These other AIA-approved courses are:

A Developer/Builder’s Perspective: Panelized ICFs + Helix Rebar

Architect’s Perspective on Building with Concrete Using ICF & Passive House Case Study

Buildings-Related Research at the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub

Environmental Advantages of Concrete Systems

Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete Structures

Opportunities in NetZero School Design

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: James Bogdan, jbogdan@nrmca.org or (412) 420-4138.