The following educational opportunities are available to industry professionals through Build with Strength and NRMCA.


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
Build with Strength and NRMCA offer several courses on the design and construction of high performance concrete buildings. Courses can be tailored to different formats—from  all-day seminars, half-day seminars, lunch-and-earns to webinars.


A prime ingredient of sustainable architecture is longevity. If a building doesn’t last, it wastes of a lot of energy, from both a human and a resource perspective, not to mention the economic value. Durability is the ultimate profitability. Builders are realizing that the promise of low first-cost is insufficient for portfolio value generation. From energy efficiency, lower insurance costs, and moisture resistance, barriers to a concrete structure increasingly collapse when industry professionals are equipped with the right design tools and knowledge.

Building materials also play a big role in deciding the safety and resiliency of our structures. From Edgewater to Houston to Los Angeles, the increased incidences of apartment fire conflagrations have provided a glimpse of what it looks like when the predicted effects of inferior building materials and code trade-offs work in tandem. The results are not pretty. Through design solutions demonstrated in this workshop, we can focus on strength rather than disaster response, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to the owners.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

This presentation provides guidance for architects, engineers and builders on how to design and build high performance reinforced concrete multifamily residential buildings using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility of highly engineered rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. With increased attention to occupant safety and comfort, design professionals can take advantage of concrete’s inherent fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features when designing multifamily residential buildings. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The article will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF concrete construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value to building owners.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs), combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with the versatility and energy efficiency of rigid insulation, provide an ideal solution for commercial and institutional buildings. With a lower first cost than wood and steel construction, ICFs improves occupant safety, fire resistance and noise transmission for office, hospital, school and retail buildings, among others. This presentation will address how the thermal properties of ICFs, combining the high R-value of rigid insulation with the thermal mass of concrete, offer building owners significant energy savings over the long term. The presentation will also provide guidance on how to minimize the cost of ICF construction to take full advantage of these benefits, resulting in investments that are secure and generate long-term value.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

This presentation provides insight on the economic benefits of building multifamily residential with concrete using Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs). Combining the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with high performance rigid insulation, ICFs provide ideal solutions for developers of apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories and assisted living facilities. ICFs are remarkably cost competitive with wood frame construction on a first-cost basis and offer operational cost savings through lower energy bills and reduced insurance costs. ICFs offer fire resistance and noise reduction qualities, important features with substantial cost saving. The presentation provides guidance on areas where ICFs can reduce construction schedules further improving the bottom line. Cost comparisons are presented to demonstrate how building with ICFs can increase your return on investment from a first-cost perspective and long-term income strategy.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

Building Green with Concrete
This six-hour course provides detailed instruction on how to design with concrete to maximize environmental performance of buildings. It helps attendees utilize concrete building systems to design high performance buildings that conserve energy, maximize occupant comfort and lower environmental impact. The seminar also provides detailed background on low impact development including stormwater best management practices, green roofs and minimizing urban heat island reduction. The course also includes suggestions on how to incorporate optimal recycled content into concrete to balance environmental impact and long-term durability. The course also provides details on how concrete can be used to meet LEED v4 requirements including the new Materials and Resources credits.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

Disaster Resilience at the Local Level
Concrete has long been recognized as the material of choice for resilient construction. Resilience has become an important dimension of sustainability, and a key element of the value proposition for high performance because it recognizes both the immediate risks of extreme weather and the long-term effects of climate change. The green building movement has traditionally focused on the environmental aspects of the construction industry while balancing social considerations. Part 1 of this program will consider the impacts of disaster events, the benefits of hazard mitigation through resilience planning and why sustainability must now consider the effects of extreme weather. In Part 2, participants will contribute in a table-top exercise and assign risks and consequences to their community. By understanding local risks, teams decide how to best utilize their tools and resources saving lives specified property.

To arrange for a course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138.

Other AIA-Approved Programs

NRMCA has other AIA-approved programs available to help designers, owners and developers to utilize concrete for their projects.  These other AIA-approved courses are:

A Developer/Builder’s Perspective: Panelized ICFs + Helix Rebar

Architect’s Perspective on Building with Concrete Using ICF & Passive House Case Study

Buildings-Related Research at the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub

Environmental Advantages of Concrete Systems

Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete Structures

Opportunities in NetZero School Design

To arrange for a webinar or course, contact: Brett Ruffing, BRuffing@nrmca.org or (240) 485-1138